Displacement Therapy

House moving looms and we find that BT are unable to supply a telephone line until 14 days after the current house owner has moved out, and can’t supply us with a telephone number until then. Our internet provider cannot supply us with a connection until we have our new number – and there is a ten day wait. Well that was the first rendering. My other half spending half a day on the phone has resulted in shortening those time scales a little, with luck, but only time will tell by how much. Continue reading

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Why What You Wear Matters – Misha Herwin

Source: Why What You Wear Matters

Weird and vivid dreams

The Constellation Canis Major - Orion's Dog SiriusI was woken this morning at 1.45 to the sound of someone pounding at the front door along with a dog howling in pain and/or despair.

So convinced  was I that I’d heard theses noises that I got up to look out of the front bedroom window. There was nothing and nobody there, nor had the security lights come on, meaning that nothing larger than a mouse had moved around out there for at least ten minutes.

I have to assume it was a dream, yet I find it odd that I recall nothing else. According to dream therapists seeing or hearing dogs in dreams represent your current state of mind – and given that we are trying to finalise a house move I guess a howling dog is as good a symbol as any. The pounding fists at the door could be likewise interpreted

Or perhaps it was just the neighbours (I gather the police were called to a domestic a few doors away just last week) yet there were no blue lights flashing.

Curious and vaguely disturbing – but always grist for the writing mill!

 

Stories at the Gladstone

november date

Renegade Writers

Here’s another date to put in your diary.

If you are interested in taking part please contact us.

 

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Jan Edwards:Winter Downs Auntiewrites Blogs Winter Downs @GraffMarni @penkhullpress #crimefiction #ww2crime

Auntiewrites Blogs Winter Downs @GraffMarni @penkhullpress #crimefiction #ww2crime

Auntiemwrites-Mystery Author M K Graff

Please welcome Jan Edwards, whom Auntie M first read about on the wonderful UK Blog Gaslight Crime, to describe her new release, Winter Downs, the first in a new series:

Many readers have asked about the inspiration for Winter Downs, and, more specifically, why the county of Sussex, England in WW2, was the chosen setting.

Put simply, Winter Downs sprang from a Sussex childhood littered with abandoned airfields, pillboxes and dugouts, along with anecdotes swapped by parents with friends and relations.

Forgetting that, just like walls in the 1940s propaganda posters, small children also have ears, and the old timers would talk about how Mr ‘V’ was jailed for sheep rustling for the black market; How Mr and Mrs ‘W’ were interned for most of the war; How sad it was that Mrs ‘Y’s only son was shot down over France, before the Battle of Britain. And…

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Review for Winter Downs: classic English crime #review #cosycrime #goldenagecrime

Review of Winter Downs

Source: Winter Downs: classic English crime

Eliminate The Impossible: Kickstarter! #sherlockholmes

Volumes VII and VIII bringing forty-eight more stories to the world's largest collection of new Sherlock Holmes Stories.Eliminate The Impossible – Sherlock Holmes is the latest project from MX Publishing that brings you Volumes VII and VIII bringing forty-eight more stories to the world’s largest collection of new Sherlock Holmes Stories.

(Part VII includes my story ‘The Curious case of the Sweating Horse’)

Learn all about the Kickstarter for this project (and take part) HERE

What is it all about?  I can do not better than to repost the words of Steve Emercz:

“The MX New Book of Sherlock Holmes Stories” collection has over 100 of the world’s leading Sherlock Holmes authors participating.

The anthology includes only traditional stories set in the original Sherlock Holmes period. Between them, these authors have sold millions of books, and they come together for a common cause – Undershaw.

This is Volumes VII and VIII – forty eight new stories specially written for Halloween.

 

“No historical material here. This is all new, and it’s beyond impressive, in quantity (more than 60 stories in three handsome volumes) and in consistent quality. Here are some — most — of the best, most dedicated Holmesian authors working today”

Sherlock Holmes Society of London review of Volumes I-III

Stepping Stones at UndershawThe authors are donating the royalties to projects at Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s former home, Undershaw. The building was in terrible disrepair and was saved from destruction by the Undershaw Preservation Trust (patron Mark Gatiss). Today the building is the new home of Stepping Stones (a school for children with learning difficulties) and has being lovingly restored to its former glory.

Royalties will go to Stepping Stones for specific projects such as the new literary program.

“We’re really proud of the MX Collection of Sherlock Holmes stories and excited about the Kickstarter campaign. The collection has brought so much attention to our school and the young people. We now have lots of great writers and artists working with kids really inspiring them to take on the challenges the world has for them”  Melissa Farnham, Headteacher, Stepping Stones

The stories in the first three books were broken into volumes of approximately twenty stories each, 400 pages each, relating to a period in time: Book 1 – 1881-1889, Book 2 – 1890-1895, and Book 3 – 1896-1929. Book 4 was the 2016 Annual, Book 5 the Christmas special and Book 6 the 2017 Annual.

Volumes 1-6 of The MX Book of New Sherlock Holmes Stories
Volumes 1-6 of The MX Book of New Sherlock Holmes Stories
The books are being produced in traditional hardback with dust jackets, as well as paperback editions. Backers of the project will be getting first edition pre-publication copies ahead of the public release. The list of participating authors by volume includes:

VOLUME I: John Hall, Hugh Ashton, Adrian Middleton, David Marcum, Jayantika Ganguly, Denis O. Smith, Amy Thomas, Kevin David Barratt, Luke Benjamen Kuhns, Summer Perkins, Deana Baran, Shane Simmons, C.H. Dye, Mark Mower, Derrick Belanger , Daniel D. Victor, Steve Mountain, Stephen Wade, John Heywood, Will Thomas, Daniel McGachey, Martin Rosenstock, Craig Janacek, (and a poem from Michael Kurland).

VOLUME II: Ann Margaret Lewis, Vincent W. Wright, William Patrick Maynard, Matthew Booth, J.R. Campbell, Robert V. Stapleton, Sam Wiebe, Jeremy Branton Holstein, Bill Crider, Peter Calamai, Lyndsay Faye, Marcia Wilson, Jack Grochot, Bert Coules. Christopher Redmond, Mike Hogan, Carl Heifetz, Wendy C. Fries, Dick Gillman (and a poem from Carole Nelson Douglas).

VOLUME III: Geri Schear, Paul Gilbert, Stuart Douglas, Lyn McConchie, Phil Growick, Seamus Duffy, Leslie Coombs, Mark Alberstat, GC Rosenquist, Iain McLaughlin and Claire Bartlett, Andrew Lane, Peter K. Andersson, Matthew J. Elliott, Jim French, Tim Symonds, Bob Byrne, James Lovegrove, Larry Millett, Kim Krisco, C. Edward Davis, Joel and Carolyn Senter (and two poems from Bonnie MacBird). The editor is an experieced Sherlockian author, David Marcum (Papers of Sherlock Holmes Vol 1&2, Quantity of Debt, Tangled Skeins).

VOLUME IV: Derrick Belanger, Deanna Baran, Daniel D. Victor, Mark Mower, Craig Janacek, Jayantika Ganguly, Denis O. Smith, Matthew Booth, J.R. Campbell, Bonnie MacBird, Arthur Hall, Bob Byrne, Andrew Lane, Roger Johnson, Hugh Ashton, David Stuart Davies, Vincent W. Wright, Daniel McGachey, Nicholas Utechin, Jeremy Holstein, David Marcum, and Marcia Wilson.

Volume V : Bob Byrne, Derrick Belanger, Amy Thomas, David Marcum, Denis O. Smith, C.H. Dye, Marcia Wilson, Julie McKuras, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Bert Coules, John Hall, Jim French, S.F. Bennett, Narrelle M. Harris, William Patrick Maynard, Vincent W. Wright, James Lovegrove, Arthur Hall, Nicholas Utechin, Mike Chinn, Tracy J. Revels, Roger Riccard, Wendy C. Fries, Paul D. Gilbert, Jan Edwards, Molly Carr, S. Subramanian, Peter K. Andersson, Matthew J. Elliott, Hugh Ashton, and Mark Mower, with a poem by Ashley D. Polasek and forewords by Jonathan Kellerman, Roger Johnson, Steve Emecz, Melissa Farnham, and David Marcum.

Volume VI: Bob Byrne, Julie McKuras, Derrick Belanger, Robert Perret, Deanna Baran, G.C. Rosenquist, Hugh Ashton, David Timson, Shane Simmons, Stephen Wade, Mark Mower, David Friend, Nick Cardillo, Roger Riccard, S. Subramanian, Carl L. Heifetz, Geri Schear, S.F. Bennett, Jennifer Copping, Jim French, Carla Coupe, Narrelle Harris, Arthur Hall, Craig Janacek, Marcia Wilson, Tracy Revels, Molly Carr, Keith Hann, David Ruffle, David Marcum, Thomas A. Turley, Jan Edwards, C. Edward Davis, Tim Symonds, and Daniel D. Victor, with a poem by Bonnie MacBird, and forewords by Colin Jeavons, Nicholas Utechin, Roger Johnson, Steve Emecz, Melissa Farnham, and David Marcum.

Volume VII – Eliminate the Impossible: 1880-1891 features contributions by: Mark Mower, Jan Edwards, Daniel D. Victor, James Lovegrove, Gayle Lange Puhl, Thomas Fortenberry, Mike Hogan, Thomas A. Turley, Adrian Middleton, James Moffett, Hugh Ashton, Geri Schear, S. Subramanian, John Hall, Jayantika Ganguly, S.F. Bennett, Steven Philip Jones, Jim French, John Linwood Grant, Mike Chinn, Robert V. Stapleton, Charles Veley and Anna Elliott, and Shane Simmons, with a poem by Jacquelynn Morris, and forewords by David Marcum, Lee Child, Rand Lee, Michael Cox, and Melissa Farnham.

Part VIII – Eliminate the Impossible: 1892-1905 features contributions by: Deana Baran, Tim Symonds, Sandor Jay Sonnen, Ben Cardall, Andrew Lane, Michael Mallory, Wendy C. Fries, Aaron Smith, Arthur Hall, Robert Perret, Nick Cardillo, Paul D. Gilbert, Cindy Dye, Tracy Revels, Derrick Belanger, William Meikle, Marcia Wilson, David Friend, Roger Riccard, Craig Janacek, Jeremy Branton Holstein, Will Murray, David Ruffle, Daniel McGachey, and David Marcum, with a poem by Christopher James, and forewords by David Marcum, Lee Child, Rand Lee, Michael Cox, and Melissa Farnham.